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, it was irene and then lee directly after that. this storm they are saying could be a 1000 a share the mid atlan. i think that means more rain than you expect to see in 1000 years. i would be willing to bet that it will not be long before we see another one of them because we are changing the odds by changing the earth. one thing for all of us to remember, even as we deal with it on the east coast, this is exactly the kind of order people will be dealing with all over the world. 20 million people were dislocated by floods in pakistan two years ago. there are people with fears about what other nations will survive the rise of sea level. we're seeing horrific trout not just in the midwest, but much of the rest of the world. this is the biggest thing that has ever happened on earth, climate change. and our response has to be the same, and the two. >> bill mckibben, what are you waiting until after the presidential election to have your 20-city tour raising the issue? >> we have been involved as we can be in the political fight, but we don't want this issue to go away when elections are over. even a
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
to clear but also to get, for example, the power companies back in. >> reporter: during hurricane irene last year, about 6 million homes lost electricity. this researcher plugged in all the information into a new program, and he believes this will be worse. >> our estimate at this point is 10 million. it could be higher. it could be lower. >> reporter: 10 million or more without power for a week to ten days, which is why this wisconsin company has added extra shifts, trying to build as many portable generators as quickly as possible. officials worry that residents might misuse some of those generators, putting them indoors, or stringing extension cords dangerously. many seem to be heeding the warnings, checking off their lists of preparedness, batteries, water, nonperishable food. >> i'm nervous about losing power. i'm nervous about the storm. >> reporter: some of the best advice from officials, if a tree takes down one of your power lines, leave the power line alone. leave the tree limb alone as well. let the power company take care of it. david kerley, abc news, rehoboth beach, delawa
before hurricane irene, chris christie told people in no uncertain terms and i will quote him here, get the hell outfit beach. my question to you, are people heeding his message to get out and get to safer ground? >> reporter: you know, they are. and you may remember, he caught some criticism for using those strong words last year after what people along the immediate jersey shore felt was an overreaction. certainly after irene's disaster, turned out to be a wise choice, especially for those living along the immediately shoreline. here in asbury park and up and down the northern coastline of new jersey, they have certainly heeded his warning. here's a look at the surf that continues to pour in. the tide is actually receding now. but i've only seen it go down maybe five, ten feet in the last 20 minutes because the actual surge continues to push water over what should be dry, sandy beach here. but obviously that's not the case. so i think throughout the afternoon, even though the tide is going down, we're going to see it hold where it is. and when high tide comes again later on tonight ar
.6 foot rise. that's going to bring the water because i remember i was here with irene, it was up to the top of these benches. now you're talking about water that's going to be about this high. so i think it's without question that we're going to flood the battery here. how much of this water gets in the subway system, i don't know. >> what about the wind? >> a lot of reports suggest -- what was that? >> are we going to see something like you see in kansas where you see roofs blown over after acres and acres of property. are we going to see that kind of wind damage in the northeast this time? >> reporter: don't think of what i'm getting here is representative of the wind because it's really not. i'm protected from the buildings. but we have gusts already out at montauk at 71. this is not like where you're going to have 130-mile-per-hour winds, so, no, the answer to that question is no, but there will be so much tree damage we think across interior pennsylvania and new york and new jersey, even parts of new england, back down through west virginia that that's a big concern. i mean,
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
tomorrow morning. just to put this into perspective for you, 7 to 11 foot storm surge, when we had irene and that was very damaging, that storm surge only went up to 4 feet, so we could see double, potentially triple the size of the storm surge that we dealt with when it came to irene. for us locally, we have a much better scenario to look forward to. highs are going to be nice and comfortable. right now visibilities are dropping off. we've got thick pockets of fog in santa rosa, napa, even concord has one mile visibility. 80 degrees inland, 70 bayside. at the coast a comfortable 69, 70 degrees as our boys come home to san francisco, so we're looking good there. let's find out how good we're looking on the drive. >> there's not a lot offin dents reported but a big warning for folks. here's the bay bridge toll plaza. they turned on the metering lights. it's a little slower across the span. also you can't make out the east shore freeway, but we'll show you the maps. look at this orange, that's where fog may be thick enough to affect your speeds. you know what, i think they're excited about
, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-lateshutdown since 1888. but the major exchanges are expected to reopen tomorrow. all systems are a go. the new york stock exchange said the opening bell will ring as usual at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. the nasdaq will also open for normal operations on wednesday. that's just what investors wanted to hear. both exchanges have been running tests today to make sure all systems were running smoothly. >> susie: the nyse's building is located on wall street, just blocks away from the section of lower manhattan that was deluged by hurricane sandy. but there was no flooding at the big board, and no other damage to the building, trading floor and trading systems. but while the nyse and nasdaq expect tomorrow to be business as usual, it won't be a typical day for people trying to get to work. many of new york's bridges and tunnels are stil closed nd
? >> well, charlie, it's a major disaster in new jersey. and, you know i've gone through irene, the october snow storm, the blizzard in 2010. this is, by far, the worst thing we've gone through. we have 2.4 million people or households, rather without power, over 200 state roads closed. it wasn't actually a levee. it was a berm and the berm was overwhelmed by the tidal surge that came up the raritan bay. we are in the process of rescue rescuing people from moonachie, in middlesex county rescuing people from their homes not from river flooding but tidal surge from the bays. not even to mention what's happened on the jersey coastline, which i think in the long run will be the part of the state that's the most devastate ed ed. you saw the scenes yesterday from up and down our coast. new jersey, obviously, this is where it came onshore. i think the state of new jersey took it in the neck worse than any other state. it's going to take us a while to dig out from under it but we will dig out from under it. >> many people waking up now to all the damage. can you calculate how mu
of gasoline as opposed to the producer, and some other hurricanes like katrina and irene before, they've hit an area that has been a big producer of oil, whereas really, in the northeast, they are the consumers of all of that gasoline, and so demand has dropped, but the supply hasn't really dropped as much. > > so the demand is dropping, especially as people are stuck home and not going to offices for instance. > > right. flights are canceled, and people are not driving around as you said, so the demand there has dropped, and that, interestingly enough, has pushed some prices in the southeast region down even further because that oil that usually would have gone to the northeast has dropped off a little bit. > > so much of this boils down to what's going on with the refineries. so what do you anticipate there? you know, we think that this is going to be just a temporary shutdown in the northeast region, and that, as i said earlier, we are going to continue to see prices continue to drop, and demand will come back up after the hurricane is through. > > quick predictions now: where do you see
lucked out with irene, and i don't know, this may be worse. >> the time to prepare is over, and now it is time to stay inside and hundred down. record predicting flooding and power outages that could last for up to two weeks. >> official from the better business bureau said that i.t. is a good idea to gather your important documents in case your home is damaged by the storm hit they recommend compiling an emergency document packet, including your social security card, your birth of the ticket, your passport, and contact information, will, as well as insurance cards, health records, pet information, and property and court documents. we will have another check of conditions around the state when we come back. >> we will let you know what you can expect over the next 24 hours, step by step. >> we have good and bad news this morning. the bad news is that the storm got stronger overnight. the good news is that it is passed parallel with the mouth of the chesapeake bay, so we will not get the worst case scenario. the storm is on the left-hand side of your screen, that big white swirl of s
iran, which everybody thought you know, how come we did not get strong winds, irene was dragging in dry air from the west. still a $15 billion store. this comes out from the southeast and the problem you have with that is you look at atlantic city beaches or down in delaware and maryland, those beaches have the water piling up and in. 1944 hurricane destroyed the entire atlantic city boardwalk in past 50-60 miles to the east. this has the possibility to have unprecedented storm surges. i believe it is a pick your poison. if it is further north, you can send a storm surge through long island where you are actually piling water up good this is a very situation. dagen: i love seeing you, joe. next time, i hope it is something else we can talk about. [ laughter ] >> i will come on and talk about nice weather. dagen: thank you. that does not help us at all. you have been talking about this exact type of storm. in memory. several years. thank you so much. eleven days until we go to the voting booth and elect the next president of the united states and that we have this morning's gross domesti
on the boardwalk. many people have heeded the warnings. they are remembering what happened with irene last year. other people are saying, you know, we have been through the storms before. we are hunkering down and we are not leaking. of course, our fingers are crossed for them. connell: along the shoreline, for better or worse with a large group of people. dagen: breaking news on the water moving into new york city and manhattan our sister station is reporting that parts of fdr drive, this is one of the two main arteries in and out of new york city that runs along the edge of manhattan. on the east side of manhattan is fdr drive, that is now underwater according to fox five. fdr drive is on the east side of manhattan. this is a critical artery of moving traffic in and out of new york city. at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, both the holland and brooklyn battery tunnel will be closing. if people are not in the city or out of the city in a matter of hours, you will not have a choice. you will have to stay right where you are. dagen: if you went up the right side of the horseshoe there, the east river is
every community is at least 75% or more out at this hour and as we saw with irene and then with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of these folks. >> and that is the latest from old saybrook, connecticutment we want to go back to cape may, new jersey. we told you this is a continually developing story and more weather effects being felt although the worst is over. jay gray is there and i understand it started raining again. >> reporter: yeah, chris, we have seen a little more rain dropping in which is exactly what they don't need in this small community. there's already been some flooding problems. that's going to continue obviously as the advance of rain moves through and really it's slowing down the effort to get out and assess the situation. we're also really seeing intense winds that continue to whip around this area. there is some damage to buildings in the city. there's some damage to the infrastructure here. but, again, we can't get to exactly how much damage becaus
experts predict considerable flooding in an area that has little elevation. last year, irene, and driving through the wall street area. now, last year, you and i were standing almost exactly here to get a very different situation. the surge isn't going to bring just water. it's going to bring force. and that's why we don't know how it will affect an area like this already in evacuation. people aren't living in the area where we are right now. if the forecasters, not you, sam, but everybody in general, close to accurate, this place is going to look very different tomorrow. maybe permanently. >> chris, we're standing right here where the water is up on the edge. last year where we were here, the water was two or feet below that. didn't really get to the top until the middle of the storm. >> absolutely. >> amy. >> chris, sam, thanks so much. we want to take a look at times square. because normally at this hour, it's crammed with traffic. well, look at that, it is a virtual ghost town. sandy has forced officials to shut down the subways for the second time in its history. josh is out on times
with these types of storms. we had your cain irene last year with over a million customers without power. rachel came through this summer knocked out the same amount without power. we've been through this before. our local officials have been through this before. they're well-trained. they have good plans how to respond to this. we've been communicating and people are taking steps to be prepared. so we feel fairly confident in virginia folks are taking the steps to be ready for whatever the storm might bring. jon: i know you have got the national guard out and ready did. you've got power crews coming in from other states to help restore power as well, don't you?. >> yeah. we know many of our power companies in virginia are prepositioning out-of-state resources coming in. national guard we deployed them in key areas around the commonwealth to be ready to deploy and help out local officials that might need assistance. we have our state police and out there. department of transportation. they have their crews across the commonwealth. they're already to go to help out as needed. jon: from virginia's
irene making it the fourth costly experienced? >> this is will be worse. three storms. we've never seen anything like this. it's definitely going to be devastating. >> gregg: i was reading forbes, i wish we could put it on o up the scream. beside for potential life and safety, economists are predicting that it will upwards of $55 billion in economic damage? >> yeah, it's hard to tell. we don't really know how it'sng. estimates are all over the place. there is one positive. sectors that desperately need more work, construction workers, electricians, plumbers all the rest, they will be finding more work. so there is some stimulus there, but again it's mainly to the negative. >> gregg: if you are contractor out there, this maybe the silver lining. the other thing, we have seen in past disasters that it dramatically affects unemployment and g.d.p. because those are tied together? >> absolutely. people won't be going to work. as you said, retailers won't be selling, there won't be tax revenues. and g.d.p. measures how much we produce. if we are not producing that much, with that many people
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
because our viewers may remember this incident. it's from hurricane irene. the coast guard and fire and rescue teams had to swim out into the rough, into the rough water to rescue a couple who had lived on their boat. how is the koebs guacoast guardg for search and rescue missions during sandy? continue. >> you know, certainly your coast guard is ready all the time to do those cases. first thing, of course, is preparation. we tell the public, it's time to stay away. we try to minimize folks that are storm chasers or sightseers in heavy weather. standing on the rocks, going out on the rip rap of a break water is not a safe place to be. it's time to be prudent when you're around the water. the winds and the seas are unpredictable and you need to stay ashore. >> at this point, i asked general russel honore the same thing, i only have about 20 seconds if you can answer, are we making the right decisions here and do you think people are heeding the warnings? >> yes, i think so. we've been working this since the middle of last week. with flights offshore, warning ships offshore. they've d
irene hit this area a lot of people evacuated. the coast wasn't hit that hard. the bigger problem was inland. that's why [ inaudible ] behind this time but for the most -- staying behind last time but for now people are pushing out because of the danger, the high winds are obvious. we're in a very protected position, by the way, and we're going to move back if things get worse. but again, we're charting it by the hour every hour and for now, things here are under control, but again it's getting to be a very dangerous situation down here. andrea? >> i was going to ask you that exact question, ron. so you and your crew, you know what to do. but the people who are -- and this is repeating the president's appeal, what chris christie has said, mike bloomberg, the appeal to people who are refusing to evacuate because they are putting first responders in danger and as i'm looking at the pictures of you, ron, the shape of that beach along the jersey shore is never going to be the same. this is going to have to be restored in some way because the enormous erosion already is being washed aw
% or more out at this hour. and as we saw with irene then again with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of folks. >> jeff stecker from wvit. thank you for that update. to the point he was making that it's so dark outside, there's so much water out there, there are so many downed lines. take this advice. this came from the fairfield police chief. "we have limited responsibilities, please stay inside your house and we are expecting massive damage." and i think that that would apply to communities up and down the eastern seaboard. we will continue msnbc's live coverage of hurricane sandy right after this. [ ryan ] it doesn't get any better than endless shrimp at red lobster. you can mix and match all day! [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's endless shrimp, just $14.99! try as much as you like, any way you like! like parmesan crusted shrimp. hurry in, offer ends soon! i'm ryan isabell and i see food differently. hurry in, offer ends soon! wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
was boarded up. the second time it's been shut down. first being last year in the lead up to hurricane irene. >> i need to go to port authority and i need to catch a bus. >> went down here to get her back on the train and i don't think -- i don't know are the buses running? >> reporter: for many new yorkers sunday was a day to prepare for the storm or get out of town. >> we were called several times by our building management company and told we had to evacuate, so we're off. >> reporter: and classes at all public schools today have been cancelled and dozens of schools have been turned into shelters. all broadway shows for tonight have been cancelled. >> the conditions out there are expected to get worse throughout the morning. what's it like out there right now? >> reporter: well right now we're seeing some wind. we are next to the water so this is normally a windy area. we're seeing winds starting to pick up just a little bit. a tiny bit of drizzle. nothing compared to what we're expecting later today. >> thanks. hurricane sandy is affecting the race for the white house as well. early voti
looked out with irene and now i don't know, this may be worse. i don't know. >> reporter: the time to prepare now over. people need to stay inside and hunker down. in cape may, new jersey, i'm daniel lee, nbc news. >> the financial markets are closed today because of hurricane sandy. for more on that and the rest of our business headlines, we turn to jackie deangeles live in cnbc headquarters. >> reporter: good morning. the u.s. markets will be virtually closed due to hurricane sandy. the new york stock exchange, the nasdaq will be shut today and possibly tomorrow. the exchanges, the brokers and regulators were worried about the integrity of the markets and couldn't ensure the safety of any employees trying to make it into work. the last time the markets were closed due to weather was 1985 because of hurricane gloria. several big banks will also close their operations in low-lying areas of new york city. these include goldman sachs, jm morgan chase and bank of america. back over to you. >> all right, thank you very much. i guess we'll just watch the markets in case they're possibly
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)